Linux Versus Windows Server Webhosting

Posted by: admin  :  Category: cPanel & WHM, Linux Server Hosting, Tips & Tricks, Windows Server Hosting

If choosing the right webhost already gives you headache, what more if you will have to choose between a Linux and Windows-based hosting server?

Let us enumerate the PROs and CONs between the two Operating Systems:

Linux Servers:

  • Since Linux is FREE, webhosting servers running on this OS flavor will cost lesser than a Windows-based one;
  • Linux has a rock solid core — you will never see the BSOD on a machine running this OS. “Server Stability” is the keyword here;
  • There are tons of free apps that you may install in a Linux server.

 

Windows Server:

  • Since the Windows operating system is created by software giant Microsoft — it ain’t FREE;
  • If a particular app that you wish to run in your website is designed for a Windows-based machine, then choose your webhost account to run this OS;
  • If you’re familiar with the Windows Desktop environment, there will be no learning curve at all to manage your website’s server running on this OS.

 

The aspnet_client Folder

Posted by: admin  :  Category: Tips & Tricks, Windows Server Hosting

ASP.net developers should be aware of the aspnet_client folder in their webhosting accounts. This folder is related to ASP.net runtime validation and has its own importance. This folder is automatically created when you enable the ASP.net extension on your site. The aspnet_client folder contains the client-side code used by some of the ASP.NET Web Form controls, namely Validation and SmartNavigation. The scripts contained in this folder get called by webpages that utilize controls that need these scripts. If you use a control that uses one of the scripts in this folder and the script can’t be found, then that control will not be able to do its client-side job.

The aspnet_client folder should be considered as the ASP.NET runtime component not your ASP.NET application. The scripts in the folder might change in the new version. This is why Publish Site tool will delete it first and then ASP.net will recreate it. If you had a web application developed in an older version, then published it to a web site with a newer version of ASP.NET, the aspnet_client should have the scripts from the same version of ASP.NET. So it is a good practice to let ASP.NET maitain this folder.

If your aspnet_client directory is missing, you may encounter errors with your application such as

“Unable to find script library ‘/aspnet_client/system.web/1_0_3705_272/webUIValidation.js’”

 

To resolve this, you can manually copy the folder to the root directory of your domain name.

Connect to a MS Access Database from an ASP Script

Posted by: admin  :  Category: Codes & Scripts, Windows Server Hosting

If you will be using an existing Microsoft Office Access database as storage for your website or web application, you may use the following code to connect with your .mdb file:

<%
Dim ConnectionString
ConnectionString = “DRIVER={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb)};” &_
“DBQ=C:\path\to\file.mdb;DefaultDir=;UID=;PWD=;”

Dim Connection
Set Connection = Server.CreateObject(“ADODB.Connection”)

Connection.ConnectionTimeout = 30
Connection.CommandTimeout = 80
Connection.Open ConnectionString
%>

 

C:\path\to\file.mdb is where you’ve uploaded your mdb file and almost always starts off with C:\HostingSpaces\USERNAME where USERNAME is your username.

While the above works for many of our older servers. The following works on our newer servers. You’ll need to make sure that your application is running in a Dedicated App Pool (check box under the website inside your control panel) and that MDAC is installed on the server which all of our new servers already have installed (ask our support staff if it doesn’t work).

<%
Dim ConnectionString
ConnectionString = “Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;” &_
“Data Source=C:\path\to\file.mdb;User Id=;Password=;”

Dim Connection
Set Connection = Server.CreateObject(“ADODB.Connection”)

Connection.ConnectionTimeout = 30
Connection.CommandTimeout = 80
Connection.Open ConnectionString
%>